Cary Page’s school year end celebration of the club’s partnership with the Read-and-Feed organization was appropriately rowdy. About 80 club members, Read-and-Feed volunteers and friends from the Cary Kildaire Club packed the party room at the Bond Brothers Brewing Company on May 25 to appreciate those volunteers and have a taste of Bond Brothers’ special brew of the evening: Cerveza Above Self. All that fun and fellowship led to talk of more joint projects with Cary Kildaire. Here’s to “Service Above Self”!

Impact of District 7710 still being felt in Dominican Republic

David Crow, our major contact in the Dominican Republic, recently posted the following on Facebook.

“Receiving our club’s new portable dental unit to be used during our frequent medical missions. This unit was purchased using remaining monies the District 7710 community fund provided during the recent D7710 Rotary mission to the DR. Thanks friends, we will put to good use! “

Cary-Kildaire receives Excellence Award

The Excellence Awards are sponsored annually by the Wake Tech Foundation, which receives and administers private sector funds for college programs.

The Individual Spirit of Giving award was given to the Cary-Kildaire Rotary Club, whose members have been supporting student scholarships for 23 years. The scholarships, valued at $2,400 each, are awarded each year to two high-achieving students from the Cary/Apex area. The Cary-Kildaire Rotary Club also holds fundraising events throughout the year. The club has contributed nearly $90,000 and helped more than 50 students complete their education at Wake Tech.

North Raleigh Donates $25,000

North Raleigh Rotary Club presented a check to the Carolina Small Business Development Fund to support their innovative program Launch Raleigh.

In the picture are President Scott Tarkenton (left), Past District Governor and Past President Matthew Kane, Lenwood Long, President, Carolina Small Business Development Fund and Germaine McIver-Cherry, Associate Director of Business Services at Carolina Small Business Development Fund.

East Chapel Hill supports Dental Project

The Rotary Club of East Chapel Hill, lead by Team Leader, Ray Tseng, completed a week long medical and dental service project to treat over 1,000 children at the Nueva Vida Clinic, Nicaragua with a brigade of 33 Rotarians from multiple Rotary Clubs and volunteers from multiple states.

Ten stations ran simultaneously for four days, administering dental services including exams, emergency extractions, dental restorations, and preventive fluoride varnish.

Dentists also applied Silver Diamine Fluoride (SDF), new to Nicaragua, on all teeth with cavities. SDF has been recently approved for use in the US, and has been touted as a dental public health “magic bullet” because it arrests the advancement of cavities, so that local dental teams can have time to repair teeth, without having the child experience pain, infection, or abscesses.

The Nueva Vida dental clinic team were taught to place stainless steel crowns on children, which have a 95% success rate in children, particularly in the face of the poor diet and hygiene habits that are characteristic of underdeveloped communities.

Brigade members also visited the local dental school, and forged a service and learning partnership between the Universidad Nacional Autonomico Nicaragua (UNAN) College of Dentistry, and Central Carolina Community College Dental Programs of Sanford, NC. This partnership will allow distance and collaborative learning for students from both institutions, and will provide graduating dentists in Nicaragua the opportunity to treat patients at the Nueva Vida Clinic throughout the year, thereby increasing the number of children served annually. It also provides the beginning of an international outreach presence for Central Carolina Community College.

Medical services were administered by Rotarian Bill Lambeth, a plastic surgeon from the Rotary Club of Raleigh, who saw up to 17 patients per day, removing growths and scar tissue in adults to help relieve pain and restore normal function of hands and legs. His nurse and assistant was his wife, Diana. Anna Wildermuth, a pediatrician, administered well and sick child exams, seeing up to 42 patients per day, for children as young as 2 days old. Dr. Wildermuth helped to address common problems, such as respiratory issues and sun exposure problems, and helped many young women start the road to motherhood on the right foot. Patients at the clinic came from near and far, with some traveling over 2 hours to visit the East Chapel Hill Rotary Club team.

A new element of our trip was outreach into two local elementary schools- Trinidad Norte and Trinidad Central in Ciudad Sandino. Rotarian Chadd Mcglone and Lisa Godfrey from Central Carolina Community College visited schools to observe and work one-on-one with elementary school teachers. Lesson plans focused on how science, technology, engineering and math educational skills are used in the real world. STEM skills were related to oral hygiene for children, in the hopes of enhancing the educational skills of the teachers, and to have teachers be involved in helping children to maintain good oral health. Funding from a “Teeth and Technology” global grant made these activities possible.

This trip is an annual service event for the East Chapel Hill Rotary Club and was the first trip to this new location. The Rotary club of Cuidad Sandino, Nicaragua provided outstanding staff and logistical support and committed tremendous resources to host the largest group ever to visit the Nueva Vida Clinic. In addition to the Rotary clubs of East Chapel Hill and Ciudad Sandino, this years’ trip was also supported in part by donations by the Rotary clubs of Carrboro Sunrise, Oxford, Raleigh, Swansboro and Warrenton. Additionally, this year’s trip was partly funded by a Global Grant from the Rotary Foundation of Rotary International and the Goodwill Community Foundation.

Central Johnston Recognizes Major Donor

Recently, Carol Arnn, was recognized as a Major Donor of The Rotary Foundation. She donated $25,000 to the PolioPlus program in the memory of her husband David Arnn, who was a District Governor of District 7710 from 2001 – 2002.

In the photo at the left from the left are Leigh Hudson, Carol Arnn and Pat Bridgers.

Launch Raleigh

The first class from Launch RALEIGH graduated on March 28, 2017.

They have now each been assigned a business mentor and will be applying for microloans up to $2500 next month to build their business.

Clean Water Changes Lives

As a member of a 37 person Rotary work team that traveled to the Dominican Republic last month, I saw firsthand the power Rotary can bring to a poor community seeking to carve out a better future for themselves and their children. Armed with a $34,000 Global Grant from The Rotary Foundation, we partnered with Rotarians from the Santiago Monumental Club to build and install 94 latrines for families living in homes constructed of wood planks with weathered tin roofs.

The highlight of the trip for me was the afternoon I spent at their community school, Santa Maria, in a classroom of High School Juniors. This school is a public school but Santiago area Rotarians have solicited the help of local foundations to invest resources and vision to give the school the look and feel of a private school. These students were excited to tell us about the service project they had just completed using a $1000 grant our district had given them one year ago. Over the course of 3 months, these students had approached dozens of homes, knocked confidently on the door, and said “I am a student at Santa Maria School down the street. I would like to paint one wall of your home at no charge. Which of these 7 colors do you prefer?” The reaction in the community was fantastic and the students returned in groups of 2 with paint brushes and youthful vigor. They told me the next problem they want to tackle is reducing litter in the streets by distributing trashcans in key locations. These students are learning they can be agents of change in their own community!

So there it is: we as Rotarians identified the need for improved sanitation, rolled up our sleeves, and made a small dent in a global problem. Along the way we helped the community help themselves. I am proud to be a Rotarian. I hope you are too.

Matthew Kane, District Governor 2014-2015
Rotary International 7710

How Lives are Changed

The following words from Patrick McCoy, posted on Facebook, captures the impact and significance of the work of the 37 District 7710 Rotarians that travelled to the Dominican Republic.

“A mentally, emotionally, and physically challenging week in/around Santiago, Dominican Republic. Partnering with the fantastic hard working Club, Rotario Santiago Monumental, on building 90+ latrines and planning the foundation for a health and sanitation program for the years to come starting at the schools. Each person pictured and those who aren’t, yet helped us, are the most amazing people I’ve ever met and got to build a stronger relationship with each and every day side by side for a true Service Above Self mission!”

Patrick McCoy of the Cary MacGregor Rotary Club

The Dominican Republic Clean Water project had four objectives:

  • Build latrines
  • Provide water filters
  • Teach the importance of hand washing, and
  • Meeting basic community needs

During the one week, the 37 Rotarians accomplished the following:

  • Build 95 latrines, making for a total of 250 over the last three years
  • Renovated 26 homes
  • Provided educational sessions on leadership, public health and nursing
  • Held a health screening session attended by over 400 people
  • Provided sheets, towels and other household items to families

The following montage of pictures were provided from the various photographs posted on the Rotary Dominican Latrine Project Facebook page by Pat Bridges, David Crowe, Patrick McCoy, Kelly Norman, Subir Mukherjee and Carlos Pantaleon. 

100 Acts Of Service

The Durham, Southwest Durham, and Chapel Hill-Carrboro Sunrise Rotary Clubs partnered with Duke University, Durham Tech, and the United Way of the Greater Triangle on the Martin Luther King Jr. Day of Service to bring desperately needed meals to the Triangle area During the four hour event at Durham Technical Community College, volunteers created soup mixes, rice bags, and bean bags to fill the shelves of pantries in the Triangle area In an amazing effort by our community, more than 400 volunteers assembled close to 84,000 meals to be distributed to partner agencies working to end hunger in Durham, Orange, Wake, and Johnston Counties.

This effort was the kick-off event to the Durham Rotary Club’s Centennial Year, with the theme of “100 Acts of Service.”

Cleveland School Rotary Makes Over 100,000 Meals

This year the Cleveland School Rotary club coordinated an event to create meal packages for the Stop the Hunger organization. Working with five Rotary clubs and one Interact Club, during the two hour blitz, 80 volunteers created packages for 20,000 meals. The Club has organized this annual event for the last six years, creating over 100,000 meals for distribution to needy people in third world countries.

Pictured right representing the different Clubs are: Kim Lewter, Cleveland School Interact (left); Don Wells, Cleveland Morning; Laura Nelson, Clayton Midday; Chuck Killian, Garner Midday; John Long, Clayton Morning and Phil Cummins, Garner Morning.