Apex Sunrise’s 5th Annual Peak City Pig Fest Raises $60k for Charity

Event Draws 30,000 people, 48 cook teams to Apex

pigfest1The Apex Sunrise Rotary Club is proud to announce that the 2016 Bone Suckin’ Sauce Peak City Pig Fest, held July 17-18 in Historic Downtown Apex, was its most successful ever. The KCBS-Sanctioned BBQ competition drew a crowd of 30,000 and 48 BBQ cook teams from across the United States. As a result, the Apex Sunrise Rotary Club raised more than $60,000 for area charities, as well as Rotary-sponsored causes. District Governor Rusine Sinclair attended the event. This year’s Grand Champion team was McAdoo Heights BBQ from Greensboro, NC.

Because of the success of this year’s event, the Apex Sunrise Rotary Foundation has been able to donate $15,000 to Western Wake Crisis Ministry of Apex. The foundation also supports other area charities including NC Victims Assistance Network ($3,500), the Miracle League of the Triangle ($3,500), US Veterans Corps ($5,000), Apex High School Interact Club and the West Virginia Flood Victims Rotary disaster relief effort.

“In its short six year history, the Apex Sunrise Rotary Club has been able to make a tremendous impact in our community thanks to events such as the Peak City Pig Fest,” said club president Tom Haynie.  “Thanks to the leadership of last year’s president Lisa Higginbotham, our club is set to have another successful year. We are so proud that our club can support so many area charities as a result.”

The Peak City Pig Fest was proclaimed a State Championship by Governor Pat McCrory. That means the Grand Champion qualifies for the American Royal Invitational in Kansas City and has a chance to compete in the Jack Daniels International representing the entire state.  This year it is also a qualifying event for the World Food Championships.

About the Peak City Pig Fest

The Peak City Pig Fest is the Triangle’s only KCBS-sanctioned barbecue competition.  The KCBS is the nation’s largest sanctioning body with more than 400 contests each year. It has been ranked as one of the top 10 barbecue competitions in the country.  Held annually in Historic Downtown Apex, the Peak City Pig Fest features 48 cook teams from around the country competing in four food categories:  chicken, pork ribs, beef brisket and pork barbecue.  The teams compete for their share of prize money totaling more than $13,000.  For more information, visit www.peakcitypigfest.com.

Crabtree Rotary present $10k to Ronald McDonald Home Charities

Members of Crabtree Rotary Club and their guests gather at Agora Restaurant in downtown Raleigh on a sweltering summer evening to officially install their 2016-17 officers.  During the event, a check for $10,000 was presented to the Ronald McDonald House Charities of North Carolina.

Destination Dix

dix2On Saturday, August 23rd, thousands of people came out to the City of Raleigh’s inaugural celebration to mark purchasing the Dorothea Dix property from the State. The purpose was to invite people to visit this beautiful 300-acre property, many for the first time, as the City begins to develop this tract into a world-class city park. The day’s events included notable bands, children’s rides, food trucks, a tethered hot-air balloon ride, and the sale of local goods.

Despite high temperatures and humidity, 30 Rotary Club of Raleigh volunteers joined with 13 Midtown Rotary Club volunteers to staff four booths. We supported the City by selling water and ice-cold watermelon, which was a big hit of the day. All totaled, the two clubs raised $2,577. This is not the first time these two clubs have partnered together, because they have joined forces on The Works (July 4th) as well as Wide Open Bluegrass, both of which are held annually in downtown Raleigh.

Durham Rotary Names 2016 Scholars

Alexandra Zagbayou, Executive Director Student U (left), Tiwana Adams, Frank Adams (Durham Rotary Centennial Scholar), Fahsyrah Knight (Durham Rotary Centennial Scholar), Sylvia Knight, Fahim Knight and Meg Solera, Co-Chair, Scholarship Committee, Durham Rotary Club

Alexandra Zagbayou, Executive Director Student U (left), Tiwana Adams, Frank Adams (Durham Rotary Centennial Scholar), Fahsyrah Knight (Durham Rotary Centennial Scholar), Sylvia Knight, Fahim Knight and Meg Solera, Co-Chair, Scholarship Committee, Durham Rotary Club

The Durham Rotary Club selected five 2016 scholars from Durham Public Schools who have achieved academic excellence and need assistance to continue their educations.

Marge Nordstrom, co-chair of the Durham Rotary Club Scholarship Committee, said, “The goal of our 2016 Rotary Centennial and Brown Family scholarships is to make their future education dreams a reality. Each student will start their college education with a $1000 scholarship.”

Named as Durham Rotary Centennial Scholars were Fahsyrah Knight, Frank Adams, Khalik Weaver, and Brenda Durhan Velazquez of the Student U program.

Named as the Brown Family Scholar was Pamela Gonzalez of the Emily K program.

Each of the students and their parents attended weekly club meetings on July 11 and July 25 at the Durham Convention Center.

“Our club is proud to help them achieve their education goals,” Nordstrom said.

Adam Eigenrauch, Executive Director, Emily K Center (left), Troy Weaver, Kahlik Weaver (Durham Rotary Centennial Scholar), Florentina Gonzalez, Pamela Gonzalez (Brown Family Scholarship recipient), Blanca Velazquez, Brenda Duran Velazquez (Durham Rotary Centennial Scholar), Alexandra Zagayou, Executive Director Student U, and Meg Solera, Co-Chair Scholarship Committee, Durham Rotary Club

Adam Eigenrauch, Executive Director, Emily K Center (left), Troy Weaver, Kahlik Weaver (Durham Rotary Centennial Scholar), Florentina Gonzalez, Pamela Gonzalez (Brown Family Scholarship recipient), Blanca Velazquez, Brenda Duran Velazquez (Durham Rotary Centennial Scholar), Alexandra Zagayou, Executive Director Student U, and Meg Solera, Co-Chair Scholarship Committee, Durham Rotary Club

Student U is a college-access organization founded in the proposition that all students in Durham have the ability to succeed. Student U creates a pipeline of services to support students through middle school, high school, and college.

Brown Family Scholarship recipients are members of the Emily K program.  The K to College programs of the Emily K Center develop educated student leaders who achieve in school, gain entry to and graduate from college, and ultimately break the cycle of poverty in their families.

Cary-Kildaire Sponsors Madagascar Project

Emilia Chojkiewicz is an engineering student at Duke University and a member of the Duke Engineers for International Development (DEID). In February, Emilia contacted Club President Dave Weiss and asked if our Club would support DEID’s joint summer project with the Duke Lemur Center. The purpose of the project was to build a Rainwater Catchment System to provide a stable water source for their community partner, Manentenina. Manentenina, is a small village bordering the Marojejy National Park. Applying what they had learned in Duke classrooms and utilizing principles of engineering and design, the DEID team’s goal was to improve access to clean water by constructing a rainwater catchment system at L’École Primaire Publique (a primary school) of Manentenina, Madagascar.

DEID’s Madagascar project brought several benefits to the community most importantly clean water, which is necessary for drinking, cooking, and bathing. Following completion of the project, residents no longer have to use non-potable water, which can lead to infections and other illnesses that prevent people from leading healthy, peaceful lives. Also, through collaboration with the Manentenina community, the DEID team worked alongside local engineers and mechanics to build the structure. The rainwater catchment system is expected to create employment opportunities and economic stimulation for the community. Additionally, the DEID team included the children at École Primaire Publique in the engineering process.  They wanted the children to be involved in the process of building something for their village, fostering a sense of pride for their work and realizing the potential that lies in engineering and education.

The International Service Committee of Cary-Kildaire Rotary Club was happy to provide $1,000 to this project and is even happier to hear of its successful completion.

A big Vision for Book Harvest’s Little Free Library

The Downtown Durham Rotary Club has put Book Harvest on the map — the Little Free Library worldwide map, that is!

Thanks to Rotary member and library builder Joe Houde, Book Harvest is among the newest stewards of a Little Free Library here in Durham. In fact, Houde is one of a group of Rotary members who have embraced the Little Free Library movement and are determined to make sure Durham is filled with opportunities for the community to “take a book, return a book.”

Clayton Interact Supports Celebration Playground

The Clayton High School Interact club held a Family Fun Day at their school in cooperation with the school alumni. They presented the Clayton Parks and Recreation Foundation with a check for $1,100 to support the Celebration Park, which is an inclusive park for all children in Clayton.

The Clayton Interact club has about 100 members and dedicated teacher advisers Sue Mullins and Janice West. Rex Everhart acts as the club liaison.

Zebulon Rotary Supports Food Ministry

The Zebulon Rotary Club recently presented a check for $840 to Tom Falvey to help support the Brown Bag Ministry site he coordinates at St. Eugene Catholic Church in Wendell.

The money was a portion of the proceeds the Rotary Club raised through its annual auction to benefit a variety of area community services.

The Brown Bag Ministry is a Triangle nonprofit group that serves the homeless and the hungry. It’s Wendell site has been operating for six years and currently prepares about 1,000 bag lunches that are distributed throughout Wendell and Zebulon on Saturdays.

North Raleigh Rotarian Helps Palestinian Teen

Members of the Rotary Club of North Raleigh have learned a lot about prosthetic devices since Brent Wright joined their club last September.

Wright is a certified prosthetics/orthotics and practice manager for the Raleigh branch of EastPoint Prosthetics and Orthotics, based in Kinston, N.C., and owned by fellow Rotarian Paul Sugg. The company was recently featured in a WRAL story about a disabled Palestinian youth who is now able to walk.

Abdallah Snoubar, 16, was diagnosed with a cancerous tumor on his left knee by Palestinian doctors two years ago.  Part of his leg was amputated at an Israeli hospital and he used crutches until he was brought to the United States by the Raleigh-based chapter of the Palestinian Children’s Relief Fund. As part of his treatment, Snoubar was fitted for a new prosthetic leg by Wright at EastPoint Prosthetics and Orthotics in Raleigh.

PalestinianTeenIt took an international effort to provide Palestinian teen Abdullah Snoubar, third from left, with a new leg. He is shown in the photo, from left, with Rotarian Brent Wright of EastPoint Orthotics, Faizal Hamdoon, another EastPoint patient, and Frank Hodges of SunStone Lab.

Most prosthetics are formed to the shape of a leg, but Snoubar’s device uses new technology with adjustable straps and pads so that he is able to adjust the tension, Fewer than 20 people in the U.S. have a prosthesis similar to this one.

The $16,000 device, manufactured by SunStone Lab and fitted by EastPoint Prosthetics and Orthotics, was provided to Snoubar as a gift, while he was staying with a host family in the Triangle. Now he is able to walk without crutches.

“It was a privilege to meet and provide a prosthesis for Abdallah,” Wright said. “He was such a fast learner and always kept a positive attitude. His determination was inspiring.”

Providing encouragement and motivation was another patient at EastPoint, Faizal Hamdoon, a Paralympian runner.

Wright has been very active in his Rotary club and now is head of the club’s international board, appropriate because of his interest in helping others around the world.

With his wife Meredith, Wright has a nonprofit organization called LifEnabled Inc., which is active in Guatemala, holding clinics and helping people with prosthetic devices.

Purple Pinky

PurplePinky2A Purple Pinky Project was recently completed by the Harnett Central High School Interact Club.

Students paid to have their pinky finger painted purple, similar to how children are marked as having been vaccinated.

The students then put their finger on a cut-out of a hand and signed their name.

Not only did the project raised $152 and made the youth more aware of the Polio disease.