East Chapel Hill supports Dental Project

The Rotary Club of East Chapel Hill, lead by Team Leader, Ray Tseng, completed a week long medical and dental service project to treat over 1,000 children at the Nueva Vida Clinic, Nicaragua with a brigade of 33 Rotarians from multiple Rotary Clubs and volunteers from multiple states.

Ten stations ran simultaneously for four days, administering dental services including exams, emergency extractions, dental restorations, and preventive fluoride varnish.

Dentists also applied Silver Diamine Fluoride (SDF), new to Nicaragua, on all teeth with cavities. SDF has been recently approved for use in the US, and has been touted as a dental public health “magic bullet” because it arrests the advancement of cavities, so that local dental teams can have time to repair teeth, without having the child experience pain, infection, or abscesses.

The Nueva Vida dental clinic team were taught to place stainless steel crowns on children, which have a 95% success rate in children, particularly in the face of the poor diet and hygiene habits that are characteristic of underdeveloped communities.

Brigade members also visited the local dental school, and forged a service and learning partnership between the Universidad Nacional Autonomico Nicaragua (UNAN) College of Dentistry, and Central Carolina Community College Dental Programs of Sanford, NC. This partnership will allow distance and collaborative learning for students from both institutions, and will provide graduating dentists in Nicaragua the opportunity to treat patients at the Nueva Vida Clinic throughout the year, thereby increasing the number of children served annually. It also provides the beginning of an international outreach presence for Central Carolina Community College.

Medical services were administered by Rotarian Bill Lambeth, a plastic surgeon from the Rotary Club of Raleigh, who saw up to 17 patients per day, removing growths and scar tissue in adults to help relieve pain and restore normal function of hands and legs. His nurse and assistant was his wife, Diana. Anna Wildermuth, a pediatrician, administered well and sick child exams, seeing up to 42 patients per day, for children as young as 2 days old. Dr. Wildermuth helped to address common problems, such as respiratory issues and sun exposure problems, and helped many young women start the road to motherhood on the right foot. Patients at the clinic came from near and far, with some traveling over 2 hours to visit the East Chapel Hill Rotary Club team.

A new element of our trip was outreach into two local elementary schools- Trinidad Norte and Trinidad Central in Ciudad Sandino. Rotarian Chadd Mcglone and Lisa Godfrey from Central Carolina Community College visited schools to observe and work one-on-one with elementary school teachers. Lesson plans focused on how science, technology, engineering and math educational skills are used in the real world. STEM skills were related to oral hygiene for children, in the hopes of enhancing the educational skills of the teachers, and to have teachers be involved in helping children to maintain good oral health. Funding from a “Teeth and Technology” global grant made these activities possible.

This trip is an annual service event for the East Chapel Hill Rotary Club and was the first trip to this new location. The Rotary club of Cuidad Sandino, Nicaragua provided outstanding staff and logistical support and committed tremendous resources to host the largest group ever to visit the Nueva Vida Clinic. In addition to the Rotary clubs of East Chapel Hill and Ciudad Sandino, this years’ trip was also supported in part by donations by the Rotary clubs of Carrboro Sunrise, Oxford, Raleigh, Swansboro and Warrenton. Additionally, this year’s trip was partly funded by a Global Grant from the Rotary Foundation of Rotary International and the Goodwill Community Foundation.

Zimbabwe Eye Project

Over the last two years, Keith Holshausen of the Morrisville Club has been planning a project to provide eye care to the people of Zimbabwe. This project in coordination with the Rotary Clubs of Bulawayo South and Victoria Falls received a Global Gant from The Rotary Foundation.

Overview

The two week project took two and a half years to plan and implement. An eight member team was involved including HCP ophthalmologists Dr. Huck Holz and Dr. Eric Hansen.

Project Achievements

  1. Supplied Vitamin A for 28,500 children in Mat North to combat Vitamin A Deficiency (VAD) which causes childhood blindness. Provided a one year supply for all children under the age of five.
  2. 300 cataract surgical packs with lenses imported. Two surgeons completed 68 cataract surgeries at Mater Dei Hospital in Bulawayo and 40 surgeries in Victoria Falls Hospital in just two days. TOTAL 108 cataract surgeries completed.
  3. Five outlying clinics visited in Mat North with approx 551 patients, followed by two day clinics at VFH for approx 280 patients. TOTAL 831 patients seen and glasses dispensed (285 prescription glasses + 369 readers).
  4. Training sessions hosted in two Bulawayo hospitals for Zimbabwe medical personnel. Zimbabwe ophthalmologist Dr Gilbert Moyo also trained alongside the HCP surgeons during the cataract surgeries.
  5. Glasses (4,000 pairs) and cataract surgical packs and lenses (200) stored in Victoria Falls ready for a return visit.

Special thanks to our many supporters including Rotary Clubs and members, Gorges Lodge, Hwange Safari Lodge, Victoria Falls Safari Lodge, Wild Horizons, Victoria Falls Hotel, Mater Dei Hospital, Ministry of Health, Wild4Life, Children in the Wilderness, BonisAir Helicopters, Elephant Camp, Environment Africa and the numerous other wonderful people who all contributed in amazing ways.

Daily reports and videos/pictures were posted to www.facebook.com/lazylizardtravel

Clean Water Changes Lives

As a member of a 37 person Rotary work team that traveled to the Dominican Republic last month, I saw firsthand the power Rotary can bring to a poor community seeking to carve out a better future for themselves and their children. Armed with a $34,000 Global Grant from The Rotary Foundation, we partnered with Rotarians from the Santiago Monumental Club to build and install 94 latrines for families living in homes constructed of wood planks with weathered tin roofs.

The highlight of the trip for me was the afternoon I spent at their community school, Santa Maria, in a classroom of High School Juniors. This school is a public school but Santiago area Rotarians have solicited the help of local foundations to invest resources and vision to give the school the look and feel of a private school. These students were excited to tell us about the service project they had just completed using a $1000 grant our district had given them one year ago. Over the course of 3 months, these students had approached dozens of homes, knocked confidently on the door, and said “I am a student at Santa Maria School down the street. I would like to paint one wall of your home at no charge. Which of these 7 colors do you prefer?” The reaction in the community was fantastic and the students returned in groups of 2 with paint brushes and youthful vigor. They told me the next problem they want to tackle is reducing litter in the streets by distributing trashcans in key locations. These students are learning they can be agents of change in their own community!

So there it is: we as Rotarians identified the need for improved sanitation, rolled up our sleeves, and made a small dent in a global problem. Along the way we helped the community help themselves. I am proud to be a Rotarian. I hope you are too.

Matthew Kane, District Governor 2014-2015
Rotary International 7710

How Lives are Changed

The following words from Patrick McCoy, posted on Facebook, captures the impact and significance of the work of the 37 District 7710 Rotarians that travelled to the Dominican Republic.

“A mentally, emotionally, and physically challenging week in/around Santiago, Dominican Republic. Partnering with the fantastic hard working Club, Rotario Santiago Monumental, on building 90+ latrines and planning the foundation for a health and sanitation program for the years to come starting at the schools. Each person pictured and those who aren’t, yet helped us, are the most amazing people I’ve ever met and got to build a stronger relationship with each and every day side by side for a true Service Above Self mission!”

Patrick McCoy of the Cary MacGregor Rotary Club

The Dominican Republic Clean Water project had four objectives:

  • Build latrines
  • Provide water filters
  • Teach the importance of hand washing, and
  • Meeting basic community needs

During the one week, the 37 Rotarians accomplished the following:

  • Build 95 latrines, making for a total of 250 over the last three years
  • Renovated 26 homes
  • Provided educational sessions on leadership, public health and nursing
  • Held a health screening session attended by over 400 people
  • Provided sheets, towels and other household items to families

The following montage of pictures were provided from the various photographs posted on the Rotary Dominican Latrine Project Facebook page by Pat Bridges, David Crowe, Patrick McCoy, Kelly Norman, Subir Mukherjee and Carlos Pantaleon. 

Lighting up Uganda

unlit2A little light for your day – Amity Senior has Solar

With the assistance of a District Grant the installation of lights for the first school in Uganda as part of this project is complete (three more to go). Thanks to the support of: Raleigh Midtown, North Raleigh, Raleigh, Cary Kildaire, Research Triangle Park, West Raleigh, Wake Forest and Durham Rotaries and Past District Governor Matthew Kane.

Our team of electricians installed 88 LED lights throughout Amity Senior Secondary school campus.

The following video highlights the project;

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EHKMMJVqcEE

Pictures from the Amity Installation: Link

Thank you from Amity’s Headmaster: Link

Video proof of the difference between lit and unlit schools: Link

 

GlobalRun4Water Funds Peru Project

he GlobalRun4Water Committee allocates the money raised at the event to support water projects. This year part of the money went to support a global grant to provide a solar-powered water treatment system, hygiene education and management training for the community of Loma Negra, in Peru. This system will empower the community to manage the system as a public utility which will generate income for future operation and maintenance, in addition to powering 50 flush latrines. The project cost $47,894 and was submitted by the Rotary clubs of Piura Oeste and Cary-Kildare.

The community of Loma Negra is not unlike the millions of communities across the world that lack access to safe water. The regional government lacks resources to tackle these problems and promote development which leaves the community with underdeveloped infrastructure. Children are constantly sick and missing school. Parents are trapped, desiring more for their families. Progress is stunted. Without help, there is little hope for this forgotten community.

Contaminated water is a primary factor perpetuating the continuous poverty cycle plaguing this community. Currently, diarrheal illness, cholera, and malaria are prevalent in Loma Negra and members of the community know that their existing hand-dug well is contaminated.

Their average household income is $175 USD per month and there is electricity available in the community. The community and local municipality have agreed to partner to provide the treatment system enclosure and help promote health and hygiene education. The community also understands that safe water fees will be collected for sustainable operation of the water treatment system.

Dominican Republic Global Grant Project

2016-04-07DR-Global-Grant3 2016-04-07DR-Global-Grant2On February 20, 2016, Rotarians from District 7710 flew to  Santiago, Dominican Republic, to continue work that began four years ago with the Monumental Rotary Club. This year, we built 20 latrines and constructed a playground for the children. The construction on the market is expected to begin shortly. Overall, we have built over 200 latrines, a playground, repaired and painted homes, visited their schools and provided supplies for families. This year we had a group of 27, but overall we have sent 65 different Rotarians from District 7710, and our friends in the DR have become like family.